Son of Babylon (Iraq-UK-Fra-NL-Palestine-UAE-Egypt, 2009)

On the road to nowhere

This is a devastating film following the search, by grandmother and grandson, for the boy’s father who’s been missing for over 10 years in Iraq. It’s set in the weeks after the fall of Saddam, in 2003, when the country was recovering from war but before the sectarian violence flared. It’s a major achievement, by director Mohamed Al-Daradji, to actually get this film made; that it’s a heartrending and dramatically satisfying film as well, is a testament to his skill.

It may be ironic to state that Iraq is shown to be ‘god-forsaken’, in a country where religion is so obviously important, but that’s the impression I got. The protagonists travel hundreds of miles in their search and we see a country littered with burnt out cars and bombed out buildings. Bewilderment competes with desperation as the default mood of the populace, with American troops shown only as a disruptive backdrop; less liberators than an impediment.

Al-Daradji uses non actors, in the tradition of neo realism, but whereas in the original films an insignificant event drives the action (the theft of a bike for instance) here it’s a missing relative. However, it’s soon clear that missing relatives are ‘ten-a-penny’ and this traumatic situation is commonplace in Iraq. A postscript states over a million of people have gone missing over the past 40 years; since Saddam Hussein took power.

As a slice of life of Iraq just after the war this is unbeatable. See here for details on the films making.

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