Pride (UK, 2014)

All in it together

All in it together

I’m amazed the first I heard of this heart-warming collaboration between Welsh miners and lesbians and gays, during the mid-eighties strike, was in an Observer feature a few weeks ago. Did I just miss it or did the media duck this class conscious alliance? Whatever the reason it’s a great story and is superbly told in this film which, I hope, becomes a big hit. It opened at number three last weekend but I expect the middle aged audience will have been catching weekday screenings. It’s imdb rating is over 8 suggesting the film is hitting the right notes for many.

The strong script, by Stephen Beresford, is aided by an ensemble cast where the well-known, Bill Nighy, Paddy Considine, Imelda Staunton and Dominic West, are matched by the rest, including the up-and-coming George Mackay, Jessica Gunning and, particularly, the American Ben Schnetzer, who plays the charismatic Mark who organises support for the miners. Although Mark is closest the film has to a hero, it’s gratifying that the film is careful to represent the actions as collective rather than individualist. It is through collective action that change is wrought.

There’s plenty of humour gained from the apparent mismatch of macho miners and homosexuals at a time when Gay Liberation was only just finding its voice in UK mainstream media. The choice of music, and there’s lots, made it clear that many of the best songs of the era were part of gay culture. Although the miners lost the strike (how could they have succeeded alone against the repressive state apparatuses?) it’s clear, from the film’s epigraphs, that the events shown in the film had a direct influence on the Labour Party officially supporting Gay rights.

There are many threads to the narrative that are stitched together expertly in this never overlong two hour film and I reckon the only misstep was not to include how the miners were correct in their contention that the Thatcher government were not interested in efficiency in the industry, they simply wanted to destroy the miners as a force of working class politics.

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